7 ways to write better tweets

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| February 18th, 2015

Using Twitter might not be simple but there are proven ways to help your content resonate better with your audience. Try using some (or all!) of these tips and you will likely see an increase in engagement on Twitter.

Use appropriate hashtags

Use relevant hashtags and use them properly. Don’t use hashtags #on #every #word #of #a #tweet. It’s going to make it difficult to read and will garner less engagement.

Keep it short

Twitter allows for a maximum of 140 characters but it’s best to keep your tweets on the shorter side. Tweets that are between 71-100 characters are proven to have the highest number of retweets (source).

Use a link shortener

If you need to link to more information be sure to use a link shortener. This allows you to use a link but save space on characters. I recommend ow.ly or bit.ly since you can see how many users clicked on the shortened links (and they’re free!).

Give credit where credit is due

If you didn’t write the original article you’re linking to make sure you credit the author. Not only does this follow social media etiquette but it’s been proven to increase engagement.

Two common ways to do this are to use via or h/t (hat tip). For example “8 reasons you won’t want to oversleep this weekend ow.ly/JheLR  via @HuffPost #HealthTips” or “8 reasons you won’t want to oversleep this weekend ow.ly/JheLR  h/t @HuffPost #HealthTips”

Be conversational

We use a lot of jargon in health care and it’s important to leave that out of your tweets. Keep it simple, it should be like having a conversation with a friend. Don’t forget to respond to tweets either. If someone took time to ask you a question or respond to a tweet make sure you take the time to acknowledge their reply (or answer their question).

Use images or videos

Including images and videos in tweets is a proven way to increase engagement. Tweets with images receive 18% more clicks and 150% more retweets than those without tweets with videos see a 28% increase in retweets.

Know when your audience is online

When you tweet is just as important as how you write the tweet. Know your audience and research when they are online as this varies greatly from group to group.

Keep in mind that everyone’s audience and strategy is going to vary slightly. What works for one twitter account is not necessarily going to work for yours. So how do you find out what’s working and what isn’t? With analytics! Stay tuned for that blog post in the future.

Social media for work

There is more information on what you need to know to set up a social media account for a VCH program, including the social media policy.

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